See it slacken and twang over your fireplace. In the large print version you can make out the famous double star with Alcor, known as Mizar, resting in the big dipper. Bow Of Orion was exhibited at the Royal Observatory of Greenwhich in London, England, for the 2009 Astronomy Photographer of the Year awards (highly commended).   A friend and I were out shooting the Northern Lights, and we figured they had just about died down so we drove back home. As I was pulling out of the driveway, I received a call from another friend who told me to "Look up..." I did and my jaw dropped. I zoomed back to pick up my friend, who came rushing out wearing nothing but his shorts and socks. He took one look at the sky and rushed back inside, only to grab his boots and again we were speeding off into the night again. The most spectacular auroras were lacing all over the sky! Cyans, pinks, blues, greens! I ran back to get my friend, and drove my car right through his garbage cans in a rush to park.  Although we missed the grandest display of the colors, we managed to take some good pictures. We were out till 3:30 am and half-falling asleep shooting these lights, we even went out shooting at Salt River, just teetering on the edge of the ravine's cliffside.  It was worth it, and at one point the aurora bleached the sky for miles and miles with her colors and her dance.

Scenic Route, Fort Smith

See it slacken and twang over your fireplace. In the large print version you can make out the double star with Alcor/Mizar nestled within the big dipper. Bow Of Orion was exhibited for four months at the Royal Observatory of Greenwhich in London, England, for the 2009 Astronomy Photographer of the Year awards (highly commended placement).

A friend and I were out shooting the Northern Lights, and we figured they had just about died down so we drove back home. As I was pulling out of the driveway, I received a call from another friend who told me to “Look up…” I did and my jaw dropped. The most spectacular auroras were lacing all over the sky! Cyans, pinks, blues, greens! I ran back to get my friend, and drove my car right through his garbage cans in a rush to park. I zoomed back up to the window and motioned from the window to come out. He figured I was in trouble or something and came out with a big bat wearing nothing but his shorts and socks. I pointed up and said “Look!” He took one look at the sky and with a yell rushed back inside to grab his gear, not even bothering to dress much more before we were speeding off into the night again. We got cuts all over our ankles and feet from running through the snow once we found a suitable spot within 2 minutes of the house.

Although we missed the grandest display of the colors, we managed to take some good pictures. We were out till 3:30 am and half-falling asleep shooting these lights, we even went out shooting at Salt River, just teetering on the edge of the ravine’s cliffside.  It was worth it, and at one point the aurora bleached the sky for miles and miles with her colors and her dance. He took a similar shot with nearly identical gear but even when we were settled nearby each other shooting the interpretation of the lights, while the same set of lights, differs widely. Just goes to show there’s more to photography than having the right gear and being there at the right time!

The scenic route is a small road connecting Hwy5 to main street, first turn as you reach Fort Smith, a small town in the south slave region of the NWT which provides access to Wood Buffalo National Park.

View of Graciosa Island from Mirador del Rio

Bio of Roberto Bettacchi

Born in Rome, where he lives.
Photography is one of his great passions since over 30 years.
His goal is a continuos research to improve skills & expertise.
He loves to freeze life moments causing emotions.

Landscape, street and travel photography.
Web site: www.webalice.it/roberto.bettacchi
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Roberto-Bettacchi-Photography/160379837338111

Lanzarote island

Lanzarote, the easternmost of Canary Islands, is a mystic and dreaming land. It’s an island of lava and foam, where you can find the eternal spring, with its dazzling sun, the low ruddy hills, the white villages and the strong and always present wind coming from anywhere.

An island with several faces so peculiar: the sandy lowland in the western side (Jable), the recent craters of the eruptions on 1730 (Parque Nacional de Timanfaya), the volcanic hills with their vineyards (La Geria) and the spectacular beaches.

Lanzarote is a unique island, maybe a never sunk chip of the legendary Atlantis island.


The road at northern side near Mirador del Rio


Sun rays through the clouds in the fishing village of Orzola


A roundtrip by camels along the crater land of Parque Nacional de Timanfaya


Parque Nacional de Timanfaya


Landscape of the volcanic lands and ruddy hills.


A tourist bus across the Parque Nacional de Timanfaya


The cost on the western side of the island near El Gulfo’s village

The Oljato-Monument Valley in Arizona as seen through a barbed wire fence.

A vine grows on the side of a building in Gary, Indiana near the intersection of Arthur Street and W 5th Avenue.

This horse drawn carriage is rattling down W 100 N just outside Miller Cemetary in LeGrange, Indiana.

A barn that was once red, but is now peeling, was photographed near LaGrange, Indiana.